book review

Review of Ratna Kapur, Gender, Alterity and Human Rights: Freedom in a Fishbowl, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018, 328 pp, £90.00

Claerwen O'Hara

Abstract

In international law, human rights are held out as the primary mechanism for achieving freedom Yet, all too often, the international human rights framework operates to discipline, regulate and exclude the very subjects it purports to free. Ratna Kapur’s book, Gender, Alterity and Human Rights: Freedom in a Fishbowl, joins a growing body of critical scholarship that exposes the ‘dark side’ of human rights. But unlike other human rights critics who tend to follow their critique with a redemptive return to the human rights project, Kapur breaks free of the confines of the Western liberal ‘fishbowl’ and begins to explore alternative emancipatory pathways through an engagement with non-liberal epistemologies.

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Published May 2019
Frequency Bi-Monthly
Volume 82
Issue 3
Print ISSN 0026-7961
Online ISSN 1468-2230